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    Canonfire :: View topic - What book are you reading right now?
    Canonfire Forum Index -> The Backalley
    What book are you reading right now? [ 1, 2  Next]
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    Journeyman Greytalker

    Joined: Mar 30, 2007
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    From: Yorkshire, Britain

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    Wed Aug 22, 2007 5:50 am  
    What book are you reading right now?

    Right now I'm reading a translation of the 14th century poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

    It's good stuff. I was kinda expecting the prose to be really heavy, but actually it's proving very readable. I'ld recomend it to anyone who's looking for a good story of Arthurian adventure.

    What are you reading?
    Grandmaster Greytalker

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    Wed Aug 22, 2007 7:14 am  

    Gawain is a good story. Read it a few times.

    Right now I'm listening on CD to the last Harry Potter and reading Sea of Dust.
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    Thu Aug 23, 2007 4:34 am  

    I'm reading the Gord series. I have read the first three, plus Night Errant, and am now reading City of Hawks before going on to the last two. It has been more than 10 years since I last read them. Lots o' info gems in them thar books. Yep.
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    Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:45 am  

    I'm not currently reading anything, but I would recommend David Edding's Belgariad series and Tad Williams' Dragon Bone Chair trilogy.

    The former is high fantasy with an adventurous tone and the latter (although hard to get into at first) is a compelling story that, in my opinion, rivals Tolkien's Lord of the Rings.
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    Grandmaster Greytalker

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    Mon Aug 27, 2007 8:35 pm  

    Yeah I couldn't get into Dragonbone Chair but I did love Williams' novella The Burning Man set in the same world.

    Right now I'm reading the Jack Vance Treasury, which is a collection of his novellas and short stories -- good stuff.

    I finally started reading Heretic by Bernard Cornwell, which had been sitting on my shelf for awhile.
    Apprentice Greytalker

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    Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:00 am  

    I tried to get into Children of Hurin and just couldn't so ~ I started reading The Hobbit instead. Wow, I had forgotten how it's been since the last time I read it and actually forgot a few things, like - many of the monsters/creatures can talk!!

    Heh, the scene with the trolls was hilariously funny - William, Bert and Tom! Laughing
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    Journeyman Greytalker

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    Fri Sep 07, 2007 5:49 am  

    New book:

    The Fall of the House of Usher and other tales by the great Edgar Allan Poe. So far I've finished the detailed introduction that details Poe's life, influences and legacy and now I'm going through the section with his poetry. Good stuff so far. Very descriptive.
    Master Greytalker

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    Sat Sep 08, 2007 9:21 am  

    Reading? For pleasure? What's it like?

    Other than game products, I'm reading Francis Schaeffer's "True Spirituality," Dexter Yager's "The Pursuit," and once again, the Chronicles of Narnia (with my kids).
    Apprentice Greytalker

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    Tue Sep 11, 2007 6:51 pm  

    I just started Dragons of Autumn Twilight by Weis and Hickman. Smile
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    Journeyman Greytalker

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    Mon Jan 28, 2008 5:44 am  

    *Casts animate thread*

    Okay I've just finished reading the book Altered Carbon by Richard Morgan



    If Philip K. **** got drunk and ended up getting Raymond Chandler pregnant, Altered Carbon is the book the kid would write.

    The book is set in a cyber punky world where your mind can be uploaded from your body, sent across the universe and downloaded into another body, stored, sent to a virtual program or whatever. This means that the flesh you wear is now nothing more than a organic suit. And the rich can keep spare-clone bodies to download themselves into in case of death.

    The protagonist, Korvacs, has been downloaded into the body of a cop sent down for corruption and has been hired by a wealthy centuries old buisnessman to investigate his murder, which he only survived through having made a few back up copies of himself stored in a safe location.

    It's a gripping hard boiled detective yarn with pleanty of grit and pain for those who like that kind of thing. The solution to the mystery is both complex and logical when you finally manage to see it in it's entirety, and makes full use of the uber-high tech world that Morgan has created. It's a bit pulpy, but gripping and I enjoyed reading it.
    Master Greytalker

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    Mon Jan 28, 2008 1:17 pm  

    I'm re-reading Brian Jacques' 'Redwall' books. What can I say? They make me feel at peace...
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    Mon Jan 28, 2008 6:32 pm  

    I just finished Pullman's The Golden Compass (was OK-ish), am currently reading a collection of James H. Schmitz sci-fi short stories (very good!), as well as a non-fiction book on Roger Bacon and the Voynich Manuscript (excellent so far, though I'm only 2 chapters in), and will soon start to read Wolfgang Baur's Empire of the Ghouls (since my print edition copies arrived today!).
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    Journeyman Greytalker

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    Tue Jan 29, 2008 2:49 am  

    New book! I've just finished The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon.



    The fact that I went and read the entire book in a single day should tell you just how good it is (and that I have too much time on my hands).

    It's about Christopher, who suffers from Aspergers and has to solve the mystery of who murdered Wellington, the dog from across the street. Not only do you get a detective story from someone who looks at the world from a compleatly different angle from everyone else, but also every other chapter has an interestive diversion on subjects close to Christopher's heart, like mathamatics or lists.

    The book will read pretty quickly, but that doesn't make it any worse. It's one of the more original books out there and I can't recoment it enough. It has a ton of heart in it and it will stay with you long after you finish it.
    Master Greytalker

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    Tue Jan 29, 2008 6:26 am  

    I'm in the middle of Fangland by John Marks; it's a modern retelling of the Dracula/Vampire legend, and is pretty good stuff.
    Apprentice Greytalker

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    Tue Jan 29, 2008 8:22 pm  

    Cool

    I'm finishing Robert Jordan's Knife of Dreams....last 20 pages. I will be reading the final book of the Sellsword Series by RA Salvatore, Road of the Patriarch.

    The last book in the series features ancient lich magic that creates a sentient castle that is quite a useful idea. You could use several ideas from it to create other sentient places/buildings for great affect.

    How about a sentient outhouse??? Laughing

    After that I move on to Book 2 of The Twilight War Series, by Paul Kemp Shadowstorm.

    Reading is a great way to avoid boredom when your stuck in very slow traffic, at lunch or break, waiting for the bus or at the doctors...take a book and you will never be bored.

    Later

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    Master Greytalker

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    Tue Jan 29, 2008 8:35 pm  

    MatanThunder wrote:
    How about a sentient outhouse???


    It's been done. 2e had a creature called a 'house hunter', basically a supersized mimic that pretended to be a dwelling. I first found it in "Return to the Keep on the Borderlands", though it has appeared in at least one old Dungeon adventure. I'm not sure if it's appeared anywhere else.
    Grandmaster Greytalker

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    Fri Feb 01, 2008 9:17 pm  

    Just finished Finn Family Moomintroll, which is a children's book one of my best friends always told me I should read and I finally did. It was fantastic. If you have kids who like wacky stories were lots of crazy stuff happens, they should love it. Just started The Skrayling Tree by Michael Moorcock. I'm almost through with Children of Hurin, which I'm enjoying -- as much as you can enjoy a tragedy about curses, murder and incest. Who says Tolkien is stodgy and boring? I'm in the middle of Midnight Over Sanctaphrax, which is the third book in the Edge Chronicles. Great children's series, but adults can get into it too. Oh yeah, and Betraying Spinoza: The Renegade Jew Who Gave Us Modernity.

    What can I say? I work in a library and I like to read. Smile

    p.s. If you get into comics and are a little (well, alot) twisted read Wormwood, Gentleman Corpse by Ben Templesmith (30 Days of Night).
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    Sat Feb 02, 2008 12:29 am  

    I loved Children of Hurin, it will make a good movie.

    I recently finished a couple non-fiction books on the Crusades. Authors and titles I forget since they were from the local library. Right now I'm reading fiction: Dan Abnett's Eisenhorn omnibus for the Warhammer 40k novel line. Good dark futuristic detective-ish drama.
    Journeyman Greytalker

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    Tue Feb 05, 2008 4:42 am  

    Yet another book read! This time it's The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut.



    This book as the funniest finale of any sci-fi book I have ever read. Not ha-ha Dead Parrot funny, but more like a that-is-so-wrong funny. And what makes it really memborable is that when you put the book down you find yourself thinking "if that were true, it would explain a lot about the world".

    At it's heart this book is basicly a satirical deconstruction and rubbishing of the phrase "Somebody up there likes me", with all the characters being put through the worst the universe can give them. Or would, if it wasn't uttery apathetic towards our plight. It is at times both heartwarming and hilarious, from the haroniums of Mercury, to the Church of God the Uttery Indifferent.

    For a bit of sci-fi with brains, try this book.
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    Sun Feb 10, 2008 9:10 am  

    I just finished reading SPOOK COUNTRY by William Gibson. Near future techno-spy stuff, mixed with... other techy geekery. I love Gibson's books.

    Before that, I had FINALLY read THE SILMARILLION by Tolkien. I wish they would turn THAT into a movie. Over Christmas, I read HITMAN by Bret Hart and AROUND THE WORLD IN SPANDEX by Chris Jericho. (Yeah, I'm a wrestling fan... sue me! 8)

    On the "to read soon" list.... right now, I'm tackling SYSTEMS by W.T. Quick. I also have the EISENHORN omnibus, THE SAINT omnibus, and the last three Gaunt's Ghosts novels by Dan Abnett, a new collection of short stories and essay by Rudy Rucker, and some random Star Wars novels.
    Master Greytalker

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    Sun Feb 10, 2008 9:24 pm  

    SUPrUNown wrote:
    Over Christmas, I read HITMAN by Bret Hart and AROUND THE WORLD IN SPANDEX by Chris Jericho. (Yeah, I'm a wrestling fan... sue me! 8)


    Hmmm. I didn't know these guys could read, much less write!
    Master Greytalker

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    Mon Feb 11, 2008 1:39 am  

    Now really, Bubba, are you becoming a snob?

    I'm currently reading Nuremburg; Evil On Trial by James Owen. Naturally, it's pretty grim stuff, but no less compelling for all that.
    CF Admin

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    Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:43 am  

    I'm 3 books into the Wheel of Time now.

    Not too bad! You can obviously tell that Jordan just grabbed elements of Star Wars, Dune, and LotR, and threw 'em all together to come up with his series, but it's a fun adventure and good read.

    Remember now, a few chapters a day keeps reality at bay!
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    Master Greytalker

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    Mon Feb 11, 2008 7:44 pm  

    Ragr wrote:
    Now really, Bubba, are you becoming a snob?


    "Becoming"?

    When it comes to professional wrestling, I was a snob before you were born! Wink
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    Tue Feb 12, 2008 8:09 pm  

    Hart's book was pretty good, considering it ended up being about 1/3 of the size of the original mauscript.

    And I can't say anything mean about Jericho's book, because I went to school with him. 8)
    Master Greytalker

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    Tue Feb 12, 2008 9:50 pm  

    He went to school, too?! Shocked










    I'm just kidding, of course.
    Master Greytalker

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    Tue Feb 12, 2008 9:55 pm  

    I'm thinking Bubba once tried out for professional wrestling and didn't quite make it. I do find it ironic that he seemingly doesn't care for it, yet his avatar has got muscles on top of his muscles. So we want to know what your paladin's Str score? Inquiring minds want to know. Happy
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    Eileen of Greyhawk, Prophet of Istus, Messenger of the Gods
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    Thu Feb 21, 2008 8:11 pm  

    Just finished "Half the Blood in Brooklyn" by Charlie Huston. Now going into "Fatal Revenant" by Stephen R. Donaldson.
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    Tue Mar 11, 2008 12:56 am  

    Le Morte D'Arthur - Sir Thomas Malory
    Master Greytalker

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    Tue Mar 11, 2008 3:50 am  

    I'm now onto Black Man by Richard Morgan; good gritty sci-fi with a political edge.
    Master Greytalker

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    Tue Mar 11, 2008 3:52 am  

    Wow you guys read a lot.
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    Eileen of Greyhawk, Prophet of Istus, Messenger of the Gods
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    Tue Mar 11, 2008 7:18 am  

    Not me. I'm lucky to get through 2 a month. Where does this thing called "time" go?
    Grandmaster Greytalker

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    Tue Mar 11, 2008 8:49 pm  

    "The Quest for El Cid" by Richard Fletcher. Fletcher sets the stage very well, spending a good deal of time giving background on medieval Spain's history and culture leading up to and into the time of El Cid. I've read a couple of books on Spain in this period and nobody has covered it quite as well this.

    I finished "The Skrayling Tree" by Michael Moorcock. Probably the least enjoyable of Moorcock's books IMO, which is why it took me so long (And I got distracted by other better books). Sad The plot is fine but his prose, which has gotten more mature in the last few decades, has become a little overworked and that really bogs things down. Do yourself a favor and read some of his less well-known stuff like the Von Bek books, "Gloriana" or "The Ice Schooner" instead.
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    Wed Mar 12, 2008 1:09 am  

    Hey smillan_31

    Did you read Moorcock's The Metatemporal Detective? If so, what did you think? I'm thinking of picking it up.

    Otto.
    Grandmaster Greytalker

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    Sat Mar 15, 2008 10:08 pm  

    NightOtter wrote:
    Hey smillan_31

    Did you read Moorcock's The Metatemporal Detective? If so, what did you think? I'm thinking of picking it up.

    Otto.


    Nope. It sounds kind of like the wackier parts of his Dancers at the End of Time stuff. I'll probably get to it someday. I've got "Tales of the Texas Woods" next on my list of Moorcock books to read. It's his take on the Lone Ranger, and of course features an Apache leader named El Lobo Blanco, "the White Wolf." I'm not much of a western literature fan but it sounds like a hoot. PM me and let me know what you think if you pick up The Metatemporal Detective.
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    Sat Mar 15, 2008 10:36 pm  

    currently I am reading:

    The West End Horror, by Nicholas Meyer

    The Atlantis Blueprint, by Rand Flem-Ath and Colin Wilson

    and

    In Search of Arthur, by Geoffry Ashe

    (only the first one is fiction)
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    Sun Mar 16, 2008 1:06 pm  

    NightOtter wrote:
    Did you read Moorcock's The Metatemporal Detective? If so, what did you think? I'm thinking of picking it up.


    I also own this, but haven't read it yet. I've enjoyed MM's evolving multiverse as the latter-day Elric/VonBeks/et al stories/novels have revealed it.

    Has anyone checked out the recently-reissued Stormbringer (original version) yet?

    cwslyclgh wrote:
    currently I am reading:

    The West End Horror, by Nicholas Meyer


    Just read this in the past few weeks. Was OK.

    cwslyclgh wrote:
    The Atlantis Blueprint, by Rand Flem-Ath and Colin Wilson


    How's this?

    cwslyclgh wrote:
    In Search of Arthur, by Geoffry Ashe


    I haven't read this one yet, but have enjoyed other Ashe books!
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    Sun Mar 23, 2008 1:18 am  

    Quote:
    Quote:
    cwslyclgh wrote:
    The Atlantis Blueprint, by Rand Flem-Ath and Colin Wilson



    How's this?


    It is well researched, well thought out, and certainly entertaining, but ultimately unconvincing with out further evidence to support the theory presented (which is that Atlantis is realy antartica, and it was moved to its current position by a pole shift).
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    Sat Mar 29, 2008 10:15 am  

    I found Unearthing Atlantis: An Archaeological Odyssey by Charles Pellegrino to be very convincing in it's analysis of Thera/Santorini as the basis for the old Atlantis myth.
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    Sat Mar 29, 2008 10:32 am  

    I have always seen the Thera theory as the most likley to be correct as well. although recently I have been thinking that the basis of the atlantis myth could be based upon the catastrophic flooding of the Black Sea Basin around 5500 BCE (it has the attraction that the black sea is actually beyond the "Pillars of Heracles" which was most often applied to the bosporus in ancient times and not gibralter).

    Last edited by cwslyclgh on Sat Mar 29, 2008 10:41 am; edited 1 time in total
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    Sat Mar 29, 2008 10:39 am  

    Anybody know any good reads, fictional or otherwise set during (in) the Roman Empire era?

    I've finished the first 3 in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series and I'm rather uinterested in reading any more of the series. I think the 3rd book gives plenty of closure to the tale and can not fathom why or how he took the series to 10 books.
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    Sat Mar 29, 2008 10:39 am  

    Anybody know any good reads, fictional or otherwise set during (in) the Roman Empire era?

    I've finished the first 3 in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series and I'm rather uinterested in reading any more of the series. I think the 3rd book gives plenty of closure to the tale and can not fathom why or how he took the series to 10 books.
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    Sat Mar 29, 2008 12:20 pm  

    Caesar by Allan Massie is, if I remember correctly because it's been a while, pretty good. Imperium, and Pompeii by Robert Harris are okay too.
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    Sat Mar 29, 2008 12:25 pm  

    smillan_31 wrote:
    I finally started reading Heretic by Bernard Cornwell, which had been sitting on my shelf for awhile.


    I read all three of those books and the first was the best in the series. The next two just didn't have the same intensity and authenticity to them as the first one did. Although I do like the fact that he does nothing to make you like any of the characters as they are all a bunch of horrible bastards.

    I just started reading "The many Colored Land" by Juliane may which has been sitting on my shelf for almost 30 years. Sometimes I need a period of extreme boredom to get through something.
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    Sat Mar 29, 2008 12:52 pm  

    abysslin wrote:
    Anybody know any good reads, fictional or otherwise set during (in) the Roman Empire era?

    I've finished the first 3 in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series and I'm rather uinterested in reading any more of the series. I think the 3rd book gives plenty of closure to the tale and can not fathom why or how he took the series to 10 books.


    I haven't read any of it but, dude - Fiction set in the Roman empire.

    A friend of mine, whom I trust highly recommended Simon Scarrow's "Eagle" series, which is in that list.
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    Mon Mar 31, 2008 12:09 am  

    hey thx Smillan thats awesome!
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    Mon Mar 31, 2008 7:12 am  

    I liked "Murder Trials" by Cicero (Penguin Classics has a good english translation).
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    Wed Apr 02, 2008 10:39 am  

    smillan_31 wrote:
    Do yourself a favor and read some of his less well-known stuff like the Von Bek books, "Gloriana" or "The Ice Schooner" instead.


    Well I think it's pretty obvious that I'm a big fan of the von Bek books. The War Hound and the Worlds Pain is a personal favorite of mine
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    Fri Apr 04, 2008 9:37 am  

    cwslyclgh wrote:
    I liked "Murder Trials" by Cicero (Penguin Classics has a good english translation).


    By THE real Cicero?!
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    Fri Apr 04, 2008 1:01 pm  

    abysslin wrote:
    cwslyclgh wrote:
    I liked "Murder Trials" by Cicero (Penguin Classics has a good english translation).


    By THE real Cicero?!


    yes, it is a collection of his essays that he wrote dealing with murder trials that he was a part of (representing the defense), he was a famous lawyer in roman society before he became a polotician.

    you said books set during roman times... this one will give you good insights into what roman trials were like.
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    Fri Apr 04, 2008 1:12 pm  

    lets see, at this moment I am reading:

    "Great American Folklore: Legends, Tales, Ballads, and Superstitions from All Across America" Compiled by Kemp P. Battle

    "Dynamics of Faith" by Paul Tillich

    and

    "Glacial Lake Missoula and its Humongous Floods" by David Alt
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    Fri Apr 04, 2008 1:42 pm  

    cwslyclgh wrote:


    "Dynamics of Faith" by Paul Tillich


    I haven't read Dynamics Of Faith yet, but I really liked The Courage To Be
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    Sat Apr 05, 2008 5:56 pm  

    "No Quarter" and "The War of Knives" by Broos Campbell are the first two of a continuing series of nautical adventures set in the Age of Sail. Like Patrick O'Brian's Jack Aubrey and C.S. Forester's Hornblower novels they're centered around the exploits of a young midshipman rising through the ranks, though this time he is serving in the newly formed US instead of Royal navy. The action takes place around Haiti during the Quasi-War with France and the Haitian Revolution. Campbell knows his way around tall ships, having served a stint on the brig Lady Washington, so have a nautical glossary handy during the naval action.
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    Sat Apr 19, 2008 5:40 am  

    I'm just about to start The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham. I read it in school, at least 25 years ago, so it was about time I read it for pleasure.
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    Wed Apr 23, 2008 9:22 am  

    I just started "Warped Passages" by Lisa Randall. This is concerned with present theories of dimensions beyond our standard perception to help resolve questions of modern physics theory.
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    Wed Apr 23, 2008 1:33 pm  

    I have moved on to:

    The Vampire in Lore and Legend by Montague Summers

    and

    Celtic Mysteries in New England by Philip Imbrogno and Marianne Horrigan
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    Sun May 04, 2008 7:31 am  

    Almost through The Black Company, which is the first of three in Glen Cook's Chronicles of the Black Company series. It's not the type of fantasy I normally like, being pretty high fantasy, but I'm diggin' on it anyway. Probably due to the hard-boiled edge to the writing. There are even flying carpets and Sweet Pelor do I hates me some flying carpets!

    BTW if anyone had read this I wonder what their opinion is on how much the Taken in the Black Company may have influenced Sargent's creation of the animuses and just the general feel of FtA?
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    Sat May 24, 2008 3:13 pm  

    I'm trying, yet again, to wade through Schillers "A History of the 30 years War"
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    Wed May 28, 2008 7:05 pm  

    I'm currently reading Philip K ****'s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, after having just finished his Man in the High Castle (excellent!). I've also recently read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Lost World and ERBs At the Earth's Core and I liked Doyle better of the two.
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    Fri May 30, 2008 11:53 pm  

    The old skool pulp is hard to beat.

    Right now I'm reading "The Stand" by Stephen King. It's been an uncharacteristically slow read for me, but interesting enough.
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    Sat May 31, 2008 7:21 pm  

    Cebrion wrote:
    The old skool pulp is hard to beat.

    Right now I'm reading "The Stand" by Stephen King. It's been an uncharacteristically slow read for me, but interesting enough.


    Are you reading the original or the "director's cut?"
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    Sat May 31, 2008 7:40 pm  

    grodog wrote:
    I'm currently reading Philip K ****'s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, after having just finished his Man in the High Castle (excellent!). I've also recently read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Lost World and ERBs At the Earth's Core and I liked Doyle better of the two.


    Yeah I think Doyle was a better writer than Burroughs. The older I get the more I value quality writing, although I still hate people who write stylishly just to show off how well they can write. If you don't have a good story, don't bother.

    I'm rereading the Thieves' World books right now, although I realized I never did get past # 8: Soul of the City way back in the mid-80's when I was first reading them.
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    Sun Jun 01, 2008 5:12 am  

    I'm reading the 1,200 page monstrosity that is the Director's Cut of "The Stand". I have read a good amount of short stories by King, but not novels. Lots of details in this one, but not a whole lot happens along the way. Lots of character building elements, but I guess that is what King is known for.
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    Mon Jun 02, 2008 1:45 pm  

    Currently finishing up A Short History of Byzantium by John Julius Norwich.

    It is abridged from the original 3 volume work - I'm interested in Byzantine history, but not 3 volumes interested...

    -Jeminnab
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    Mon Jun 02, 2008 8:02 pm  

    Cebrion wrote:
    I'm reading the 1,200 page monstrosity that is the Director's Cut of "The Stand". I have read a good amount of short stories by King, but not novels. Lots of details in this one, but not a whole lot happens along the way. Lots of character building elements, but I guess that is what King is known for.


    King is great at character development, though IMO he has kind of a limited range, i.e. same dude different name from book to book (Sometimes literally!), at least in his novels. Which leads me to my view that he just ain't that great of a novelist, but is a master of the short story form. I've found quite a few authors that fit that description; Nancy Kress and Kim Stanley Robinson among others. King never seems to know how to wrap up a novel. Just IMO of course.
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    Sat Jun 07, 2008 7:48 pm  

    currently reading The Analects of Confucius: With Selections from the Traditional Comentaries Translated by Edward Slingerland.
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    Sun Jun 08, 2008 3:07 am  

    I'm a huge fan of Stephen King for exactly the reasons you guys mention. His characters are occasionally templates but the way in which he builds them are highly entertaining. Also, you never get too comfortable because he's not afraid to kill them off after spending so much time on them. This, I feel, is a flaw in a lot of Fantasy, especially prevalent amongst female writers. You just know they won't kill the characters off, therefore every cliffhanger is a non-event. There are notable exceptions. I agree, also, that King's biggest flaw is endings. Some work, some don't.

    I'm currently finishing off "The Ice Museum" by Joanna Kavenna. It's a travelogue/history of the the search for Thule. It's a good read and may be useful for anybody whose campaign takes in the far North.
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    Tue Jun 10, 2008 2:57 pm  

    Ok gave up on Schiller yet again and switched to Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere
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    Wed Jun 11, 2008 8:32 am  

    On to The Opium Wars by Hanes and Sanello.
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    Fri Jun 13, 2008 8:19 pm  

    I am still working on The Analects, and have added Joseph Cambell's The Mask of God: Primitive Mythology to my night stand.
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    Sat Jun 14, 2008 8:09 pm  

    I am reading *A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson. It's an entertaining history of the formation of the universe and earth with often whimsical origins of various sciences and famous scientists.

    Interestingly it's a book that some guest left in our lost & found at work. I never got hooked by a 'found' book before!
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    Thu Jun 19, 2008 1:12 pm  

    Just started Imperium by Robert Harris. Really enjoyed his Pompeii so all bodes well for this one.
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    Sun Jul 06, 2008 10:24 am  

    Billy the Kid: The Endless Ride by Michael Wallis.
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    Tue Jul 08, 2008 5:15 am  

    Imperium was great. On to "Children Of Hurin" now.
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    Tue Aug 19, 2008 3:20 am  

    I've finished with "Children Of Hurin". Warning; do not read if a little down in the dumps.

    Also completed "Lisey's Story" by Stephen King. Typical King, 300 pages in, not much has happened, totally hooked into the main chracter's life. The b****** does it to me every time.

    Now onto "Revelation Space" by Alastair Reynolds.
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    Wed Aug 20, 2008 12:12 am  

    I just finished The Zombie Survival Guide by Max Brooks, and have just started reading Arthur and the Lost Kingdoms by Alistair Moffat.
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    Wed Aug 20, 2008 12:43 am  

    By reading The Zombie Survival Guide does this mean you know something we don't? Shocked
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    Wed Aug 20, 2008 12:03 pm  

    Ragr wrote:
    By reading The Zombie Survival Guide does this mean you know something we don't? Shocked
    I am just trying to prepare for all 2012 possibilities Wink
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    Wed Aug 20, 2008 8:03 pm  

    Ragr wrote:
    I've finished with "Children Of Hurin". Warning; do not read if a little down in the dumps.

    I described it to someone as probably the most tragic story ever written. He said, "By the guy that wrote the Hobbit?" I just said "Yeah, imagine the Hobbit, but with incest, murder, treachery, and suicide, and oh yeah, no hobbits."
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    Wed Aug 20, 2008 8:17 pm  

    cwslyclgh wrote:
    Ragr wrote:
    By reading The Zombie Survival Guide does this mean you know something we don't? Shocked
    I am just trying to prepare for all 2012 possibilities Wink


    World War Z, also by Max Brooks is the only talking book that I would recommend above the written version. It's pretty awesome and has a ton of people doing the narration; Alan Alda, Henry Rollins, Rob "Meathead" Reiner, Carl Reiner, Mark Hamill, John Turturro and others. There were parts of this that really creeped me out, especially a scene in the ship breaking yards at Alang, India. Holy crap!
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    Wed Aug 20, 2008 8:37 pm  

    smillan_31 wrote:
    Ragr wrote:
    I've finished with "Children Of Hurin". Warning; do not read if a little down in the dumps.

    I described it to someone as probably the most tragic story ever written. He said, "By the guy that wrote the Hobbit?" I just said "Yeah, imagine the Hobbit, but with incest, murder, treachery, and suicide, and oh yeah, no hobbits."


    LOL. Yes this is true. At Lord of the Ring's darkest, it does not approach the gloom of Children of Hurin. I love it!
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    Wed Aug 20, 2008 10:01 pm  

    Currently reading the recent reprint of original versions of Moorcock's Elric tales: Elric: To Rescue Tanelorn. Good stuff, and interesting to read these earliest versions of the stories I've read in other forms :D
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    Thu Aug 21, 2008 12:20 am  

    smillan; a career in blurb writing for book covers awaits Laughing

    Grodog; I absolutely love Elric, the complete anti-hero, and what an ending to his story. I just wished the original books hung together better as a series. I guess that sometimes the drugs DO work. And other times.........?

    Btw, what are people's opinions on Eriksson?. My players love the guy. I've read the first 2 books; Gardens Of The Moon I liked, Deadhouse Gates I found to be a bit of a hard slog.
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    Thu Aug 21, 2008 12:35 am  

    cwslyclgh wrote:
    I just finished The Zombie Survival Guide by Max Brooks...


    I just finished reading that!

    Remember, always stick to the urban centers where you can get lots of supplies, and be sure to visit your local hospitals and police stations for aid when a zombie outbreak is at its height! Shocked

    I'll be in my remote mountain-top compound complete with a pure spring water well, an underground and very silent generator linked to a water wheel powered by the local river(as well as to a bank of bicyles should that river stop flowing for whatever reason), and a variety of home grown foodstuffs. Oh, and lots of guns and ammo. Happy
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    Thu Aug 21, 2008 7:36 am  

    "Everyone on Canonfire is a Zombie!! Zombies I tell you! They're coming to eat us all!!" Shocked

    Arrgghhh!!!

    (Opens a packet of pills. Consumes contents.)

    "Better now." Happy
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    Fri Aug 22, 2008 7:38 pm  

    Ragr wrote:
    smillan; a career in blurb writing for book covers awaits Laughing

    Grodog; I absolutely love Elric, the complete anti-hero, and what an ending to his story. I just wished the original books hung together better as a series. I guess that sometimes the drugs DO work. And other times.........?

    Btw, what are people's opinions on Eriksson?. My players love the guy. I've read the first 2 books; Gardens Of The Moon I liked, Deadhouse Gates I found to be a bit of a hard slog.


    Thanks man. At least there's some potential outlet for my creative writing urges other than making up fluff for GH.

    I've never even heard of Eriksson's books. I just read a review though and have to admit I'm a sucker for the word "gritty" when it comes to fantasy, so maybe I'll check it out.

    I just finished a fantasy collection, "Fantasy: the Best of the Year, 2007," edited by Rich Horton. There's some really good stuff in there. Not your traditional swords and sorcery stuff, but very nice modern fairy tales and ghost stories. "Pol Pot's Beautiful Daughter" especially stood out. I'm also about finished with "Tales Before Tolkien: The Roots of Modern Fantasy." Lotsa good stuff. I'm not sure Lord Dunsany would approve of that review, but screw him, he's dead.
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    Sat Aug 23, 2008 4:34 am  

    smillan said;I've never even heard of Eriksson's books. I just read a review though and have to admit I'm a sucker for the word "gritty" when it comes to fantasy, so maybe I'll check it out.

    I'd really recommend the first book (Gardens Of The Moon). It is gritty; plenty of characters receive a sound thrashing (or worse). And the powerful guys are not immune either.

    My problem with the second book was (I think) with one particular set of characters/storyline; having to spend 300 pages (1/3rd of the book) in their company was a real ordeal, and there were plenty of moments when I'd scare everyone in the house by suddenly screaming "stop all this bleedin' handwringing and either get on with it or die!!!". The other 2 sets of characters, occupying the remaining 2/3rds, were fine.
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    Sat Aug 23, 2008 6:13 pm  

    Ragr wrote:
    Grodog; I absolutely love Elric, the complete anti-hero, and what an ending to his story. I just wished the original books hung together better as a series. I guess that sometimes the drugs DO work. And other times.........?


    And at other times you take a wrong turn down the planar corridor, and end up in a Jerry Cornelius novel ;)
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    Sat Aug 23, 2008 8:26 pm  

    Ragr wrote:
    My problem with the second book was (I think) with one particular set of characters/storyline; having to spend 300 pages (1/3rd of the book) in their company was a real ordeal, and there were plenty of moments when I'd scare everyone in the house by suddenly screaming "stop all this bleedin' handwringing and either get on with it or die!!!". The other 2 sets of characters, occupying the remaining 2/3rds, were fine.


    Yeah I've read some books like that where I just didn't give a crap about one group of characters but others I liked immensely. One that was like that I remember actually re-reading just the sections with the characters that I liked, but I can't remember the author or title.
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    Sun Aug 24, 2008 11:52 am  

    About half-way through Baudolino by Umberto Eco. Loved Name of the Rose, but this one is dragging a bit. I think the storytelling meanders too much. Still better than most fiction I've read, though.
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    Sat Oct 18, 2008 8:42 am  

    I am currently reading Only Hope: Coming of Age Under China's One-Child Policy By Vanessa Fong
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    Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:45 am  

    I'm onto "The Real Middle Earth" by Brian Bates, subtitled magic and mystery in the Dark Ages.
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    Sat Oct 18, 2008 10:13 am  

    im reading jorney to the west, the story of sun wukong (the monkey king).

    very good book if you like chinese mythology
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    Sat Oct 18, 2008 7:55 pm  

    Yeah, I loved Journey Into the West, which I actually read as I was driving the moving truck west across the country from New Jersey to Washington. Not the whole thing, just an abridged version

    If you like Chinese fantasy see if you can find Barry Hughart's "Bridge of Birds." He wrote two novels that followed it but they're kind of hard to find. Another good one is M. Lucie Chin's "The Fairy of Ku-She."

    Finished R. Garcia y Robertson's "Firebird" last week. Set in a fantasy medieval Russia. Pretty enjoyable.

    I've been reading some juvenile fantasy lately. Katherine Langrish. "Troll Fell" and "Troll Mill." Norse setting with lots of fey critters. Good stuff.
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    Thu Nov 20, 2008 8:28 am  

    currently reading Cleopatra's Needle by Steven Siebert. It started off pretty good, but has shifted gears toward the middle (and not in a good way, but I am hoping it picks up again toward the end).

    and Excelsior! The Amazing Life of Stan Lee by Stan "the Man" himself (with a little help from George Mair)
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    Thu Nov 20, 2008 9:05 am  

    "Firewall" by Henning Mankell. All part of a series about a Swedish detective called Wallander (a wonderfully rounded character full of genius and flaws in equal measure). Gloriously bleak and highly recommended if you like grim procedurals.
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    Thu Nov 27, 2008 10:56 am  

    The Silmarillion is my favortie Tolkien book and it includes Hurin's story. I don't know if "Children of Hurin" enlarges upon that portion of The Silmarillion, since I've never read it. Confused

    I've just finished re-reading "Tolkien's Ring," by David Day, published 1994. The book does some analizing about Tolkien's possible sources and inspirations.

    The Viking obsesion with "Rings of Power" was interesting and seems to have been a big influence:

    The Domhring (Ring of Doom) before the Temple of Thor vs. Tolkien's Ring of Doom outside the gates of Valimar.

    Viking's Aesir vs. Tolkien's Ainur. Viking's Vanir vs. Tolkien's Valar.

    Viking's Asgard is only reached by the Rainbow Bridge on the flying horses of the Valkyries.

    Tolkien's Aman is only reached by the Straight Road in the flying ships of the Elves.

    Of course, there are many other comparisons. "Tolkien's Ring" is full of good stuff. Give it a try.
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    Thu Nov 27, 2008 1:24 pm  

    The Once and Future King by T.H. White. Never read it, though I've known about it for some time. The whimsical quality of the writing is not what I most enjoy about fanatsy stories, but put in the proper context it is certainly an entertaining read. Just when you think this really is more of a story for kids, something cheeky or quite viscious(think Grimms' Fairy Tales) smacks you upsdie the head. Laughing

    I'm only about half way through the book so far, but it makes mention of some lesser known characters from the Arthurian tales. Makes me want to pull out my copy of Le' Morte D'Arthur. Cool
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    Sat Dec 06, 2008 6:46 am  

    Lion Of Ireland by Morgan Llywelyn. A fictional account of the life of Brian Boru. Hacking, maiming, shagging, drinking and burly men making speeches about honour, glory and the like. What's not to love, man. Cool
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    Tue Dec 09, 2008 2:16 pm  

    Jeminnab wrote:
    About half-way through Baudolino by Umberto Eco. Loved Name of the Rose, but this one is dragging a bit. I think the storytelling meanders too much. Still better than most fiction I've read, though.


    I enjoyed this book up to the point where the characters head east to find the Kingdom of Prester John (?)...I really enjoyed Baudolino's "origin story", from medieval Italy to Paris to Constantinople if I recall correctly...Never knew what was true and what was fabrication, so great was Baudolino's Bluff skill...After the trip through Asia Minor, I lost interest...

    Currently, I'm reading Clive Barker's Mister B. Good...An, initially, humorous tale of a demon pulled from the ninth circle of Hell to 14th century Europe and his century of adventuring there, leading to his binding in the very book the reader is perusing...Seventy pages to go...

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