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    Adventure Paths from Dungeon Magazine
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    Journeyman Greytalker

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    Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:06 am  
    Adventure Paths from Dungeon Magazine

    In the recent few weeks, I have had the chance to read through many of my old issues of Dungeon Magazine and decided to go through the large Adventure Paths and see how they stack up.

    Now disclaimer: I never ran these adventures as a DM or player. My little reviews are purely from the Greyhawk lore aspect. Some of them had better Greyhawk connection than others, some seemed just shoehorned in.

    I will start with the first one - The Shackled City.
    Journeyman Greytalker

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    Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:28 am  
    The Shackled City

    The Shackled City Adventure Path was the first of an ambitious series from Dungeon Magazine. There were eleven adventures spread out starting at Issue 97 and ending at Issue 116. Now there had been multi part adventures in Dungeon before, but none so large as this.

    In 2005, there was a compilation of this adventure path with some additional materials. I did a review for that hardcover compilation here:

    http://www.canonfire.com/cf/modules.php?name=Reviews&rop=showcontent&id=79

    Now, I re-read my review and the adventures and want to modify things a bit. One: the Greyhawk connection is not particularly strong as written, but in the passing of years, the Greyhawk community has retrofit the City of Cauldron as being an independent city in what was once an empty part of Oerth. That can make the adventure path mesh in more with established campaigns - which brings me to the next point.

    This adventure path is very dungeon heavy. The path is, from a practical standpoint, more of a setting - the fantastic city and the area around it, rather than a cohesive story from start to end. The connections to the overarching plot, especially early on, are very subtle and likely only the DM will appreciate the path until the PCs get to the higher levels. A better way to view the Adventure Path may well be to use it as more of a gazetteer of this area, where a party can come to it and go exploring as needed.

    With some editing, a DM can condense the plots of Cagewrights to a high level party (i.e. come in at the middle of this path) and still have a good adventure with it.

    Overall, I think this is still a good purchase. Once I saw what came after it though, I think the other adventure paths had more meat for a Greyhawk campaign.

    If anyone here has played the path, what are your thoughts behind this one?

    O-D
    GreySage

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    Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:59 am  

    The Oerth connections were more explicit in the hardcover version. That, and the maps provided in the Flanaess map inserts and Savage Tide path later on, are why the fan community associates Cauldron with the Amedio.
    Apprentice Greytalker

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    Tue Jul 07, 2020 10:43 am  

    rasgon wrote:
    The Oerth connections were more explicit in the hardcover version. That, and the maps provided in the Flanaess map inserts and Savage Tide path later on, are why the fan community associates Cauldron with the Amedio.


    Savage Tide, now there's the ultimate Adventure Path (once you get past Sasserine), but you'll get to that Wink ...

    Kwint
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    Wed Jul 08, 2020 8:47 pm  
    Age of Worms General Points

    The next Adventure Path was the Age of Worms.

    This is going to take some time to go over, so I will break up my thoughts in a couple threads. I will do a pros, a cons, and an overall post to this thread later. Before I get to more of the review, I will make some general points.

    This adventure path is a large one, with 12 adventures, a couple gazetteer type articles, follow ups in Dragon Magazine and downloadable extras. By this time, Erik Mona was the editor-in-chief of Dungeon Magazine and you can see his love for Greyhawk come through in a lot of the materials Dungeon put out at that point. He himself kicks off the first adventure for the Age of Worms in Issue 124.

    The main villain is the mysterious demigod Kyuss. I remember having seen the first appearance of his Sons in the 1e Fiend Folio. The gruesome illustration of these baddies was absolute nightmare fuel. So a campaign to fight against these creatures is bound to be a grim, doom laden affair.

    While the setting is pretty clearly Greyhawk, there were a few instances where, due to some technicalities, the proper names were modified (i.e. the City of Greyhawk is just referred to as "the Free City", Tenser and Bucknard make appearances under different names). This does not detract from the adventure but I will discuss later some of the name dropping just for the sake of it later on.

    My first overall impressions are to say - great work on having a Greyhawk specific adventure path! I mentioned before that as originally run, The Shackled City was a generic setting. This one starts out in an established part of Oerth near the hub of the Free City of Greyhawk. This is something the GH fan can sink their teeth into.

    Let me end on that general note before I move to specifics. I will be back later with the Pros and cons.
    Apprentice Greytalker

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    Mon Jul 13, 2020 3:55 am  

    I'm eager to read this! Looking forward to read the next parts.
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    Mon Jul 13, 2020 10:04 am  

    Age of Worms has one of its adventure components set in the Cauldron region, further tying it to Greyhawk prior to the Savage Tide.
    IIRC, WOTC mandated that the city of Greyhawk had to be the generic "Free City" (along with some other changes) because they didn't want it 'tied down' to a single setting.
    Journeyman Greytalker

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    Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:41 am  
    Pros - Age of Worms

    Ok, I am back and will go over the positives and negatives that I found when reading through the Age of Worms Adventure Path. First - the Pros!

    Couple caveats: this is all from me just reading the materials, I have not played them, so I will not comment on the mechanics of the game. Also, there may be spoilers in my review - so SPOILER ALERT!

    Pros: Very good Greyhawk lore comes through most of the adventures. This path was set up with Greyhawk, not a generic setting in mind. Though some of the names were fuzzed up a bit, to the Greyhawk fan it is very easy to just make the names fit. That, by itself, makes this Adventure Path worth perusing.

    In the course of the adventures, a couple locations were given full gazetteer style treatment (Diamond Lake in Dungeon 124 and the City of Alhaster in Dungeon 131) complete with maps. I am a sucker for detailed Greyhawk gazetteers and these were both very well done. In particular, I liked the idea of how the Bandit Kingdoms came to have a port city. This tidbit of history can be meshed into a Shield Lands campaign to reclaim the area.

    Next positive is the villains: Kyuss to this point was not overly used, so made for a perfect nemesis. As I mentioned earlier in this thread, the Sons of Kyuss were one of the scariest creatures in the first edition monster books. Giving them center stage was a real treat. Another notable villain is the undead dragon Dragotha, who is an epic level foe and calls back to the first edition adventures as well (he was first mentioned in a map handout from the adventure S2 White Plume Mountain).

    Prince Zeech is a foe that is supposed to be handled with social graces and charisma as opposed to fighting skills. That makes the Adventure "Prince of Redhand" unique. Made a nice change of pace to the dungeoneering that is very common to the Dungeon Adventures.

    All in all, with good homages to old school Greyhawk, new Greyhawk details, memorable epic level villains, and appropriately high stakes for your heroes, this is a great Adventure Path.

    Next I will go into what, in my opinion are the Cons.
    Journeyman Greytalker

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    Sat Jul 18, 2020 10:42 am  
    Cons - Age of Worms

    Cons: While I did like the Greyhawk references, there comes a point when all it becomes is name dropping. Case in point - the first adventure in Dungeon 124 has a cairn that dates back to the Battle of Pesh. It is nice to have some more lore on the Winds Dukes of Aaqa, but there is a tease about the Rod of Seven Parts. The first part of the Rod can be found in one of the cairns, with potentially two parts of the Rod directly mentioned in the adventure path.

    But the Rod of Seven Parts is to only be a minor part of this adventure as written. There is even a sidebar that states that while artifacts have a way of turning up in major events, they are minor roles in this adventure.

    I appreciate the concept, but in my opinion, dropping an artifact with all the backstory like the Rod of Seven Parts as a side quest is too much of a tease/distraction. There was a whole boxed set in the 2nd Edition that centered around a campaign to find the Rod, so I think that just to add in this artifact in passing is a bridge too far. To compound matters, later in the Adventure Path you come across a villain with the Hand of Vecna. That is just too much adding in other side bars that makes what you are doing seem less by comparison.

    "Too much" is also a theme with regards to some of the encounters. They seem hideously difficult to survive as presented in the adventures. That is a critique I have on a lot of high level adventuring, in order to make it level appropriate, the complexity of the encounters and levels of the challenges gets way out of hand.

    Lastly, this may be mostly a matter of taste, but I would have preferred a more dark and grim theme with the Sons of Kyuss. While the style of adventures was broken up with a wilderness trek and a social party scenario, I wanted more "backs against the wall fighting hordes of undead" played out.

    The "Giants of the Rift" adventure featured a large scale battle between giants and living dragons. In my Greyhawk, dragons are more rare and that just smacked to me of being too much high level action. Now an invasion of undead dragons is more on the theme and with some work can be modified to reflect that. Still, I would have preferred that maybe the numbers of adventures be lessened rather than constantly upping the ante.

    There was another name drop in that scenario, the dragon Brazzemal from G3 was plopped in for no real reason other than to have the name. Too much of the name dropping from old school modules just made me want to play them over slogging on through this Adventure Path.

    So that is my take on the basics - I will do an overall assessment shortly.


    Last edited by Osmund-Davizid on Tue Sep 15, 2020 9:11 am; edited 1 time in total
    CF Admin

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    Thu Jul 23, 2020 1:23 pm  
    Re: Cons - Age of Worms

    Osmund-Davizid wrote:

    So that is my take on the basics - I will do an overall assessment shortly.


    Looking forward to it! :D

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    Fri Jul 24, 2020 7:06 am  

    On a similar note, I appreciate that Age of Worms contains the Crimson Octych of Maure Castle… which also saddens me because that particular quest will likely never be complete!

    (I recall the Deep Blue Octych is found in the "Ghost Tower of Inverness," the Orange Octych is found in "[the Expedition to the Ruins of] Castle Greyhawk," the Yellowish-Gold Octych is found in the "Warlock's Walk" of Maure Castle [via the Oerth Journal], and an Octych of unknown color is/was held by one "Barrat Roshan" of Molag ["As He Lay Dying"]).
    Journeyman Greytalker

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    Mon Jul 27, 2020 8:52 pm  
    Overall Assessment - Age of Worms

    Overall Assessment for Age of Worms:

    This is truly a Greyhawk adventure. As discussed earlier, notwithstanding some mild name changes, this is made for the Greyhawk fan. The bulk of the action takes place in the middle of the Flanaess, you get to interact with some famous Greyhawk NPCs, and it adds to the lore of some old school D&D monsters and artifacts. The big bad guys are very cool, not overdone - Kyuss is kept just enough in the background in the lower level adventures to build up the sense of menace and is a very good choice for a villain.

    Some aspects of the Adventure Path did not appeal, but largely that is a matter of taste. For example, I did not like the "Ebon Triad" cult as written, mainly because the religions used were (in my opinion) too well established to make that a credible plot. Maybe if the three gods were more obscure it would make more sense to me, that is something that can easily be edited.

    As a whole, it is also a very difficult adventure for PCs to survive. The finale in Dungeon 135 flat out states that the Worm God must die. I do not like setting my PCs up to kill deities (the concept is too overly powered IMO), but that can be also edited to taste. There is a lot of lore dropping of various artifacts throughout the Path, and a little of that is a good thing, I think it was a bit overdone.

    Taking everything into consideration - this is a fine series of adventures and the whole series is worthy of any Greyhawk fan to mine for its lore and send a few adventurers down the path.

    I give it four stars out of five, mostly because for all that, I enjoyed the next Adventure Path even more.

    Next is the Savage Tide!
    CF Admin

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    Tue Jul 28, 2020 7:54 am  

    Amesang wrote:
    On a similar note, I appreciate that Age of Worms contains the Crimson Octych of Maure Castle… which also saddens me because that particular quest will likely never be complete!


    Never say never ;)

    Amesang wrote:
    (I recall the Deep Blue Octych is found in the "Ghost Tower of Inverness," the Orange Octych is found in "[the Expedition to the Ruins of] Castle Greyhawk," the Yellowish-Gold Octych is found in the "Warlock's Walk" of Maure Castle [via the Oerth Journal], and an Octych of unknown color is/was held by one "Barrat Roshan" of Molag ["As He Lay Dying"]).


    That sounds about right. There's good discussion/summaries on MC on the Paizo boards at https://paizo.com/community/forums/archive/paizo/booksMagazines/dungeon/maureCastle

    Allan.
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    Sun Aug 16, 2020 7:47 pm  
    Savage Tide Overview

    The next Adventure Path was bound to be a big one.

    The Savage Tide was previewed in Dungeon 138 and properly began in Dungeon 139 and went to issue 150. There was a series of supporting articles - "Savage Tidings" - in Dragon Magazine from issue 348 to 359. These are both notable as they mark the end of the print run for both these periodicals - making this adventure path a "last hoorah" of sorts.

    And what a series it is! Like the previous adventure path, it is firmly set in the World of Greyhawk. Beginning in the city of Sasserine, it takes adventurers to the Isle of Dread (retrofit to Greyhawk from the D&D module X1), the vile city of Scuttlecove, and to the Abyss. The big, bad, evil guy is none other than the Prince of Demons - Demogorgon.

    It is altogether fitting to have these elements come together as the last of Dragon and Dungeon's printed support. Module X1 The Isle of Dread was a classic module that many a player and DM cut their teeth on in the earliest days of the hobby. Demogorgon was the original biggest and baddest of First Edition, having the toughest stats in the Monster Manual (he had 200 hit points!).

    The overall theme is largely swashbuckling adventuring, with the players having to take to the seas and fight pirates almost every step of the way. The players uncover a plot to seed the coastal cities of Oerth with demonically powered pearls which, when activated, will cause a "savage tide" to wash over the immediate area, turning people into hideous monsters in the thrall of Demogorgon. The adventurers must face down the perils of the seas, the Isle of Dread, and the Abyss in order to stop this nefarious plot.

    As before, I will list my positive points and negative points in separate entries. Suffice to say, this is a true epic not only for Greyhawkers, but for an era of players and DMs that have memories of the 1st edition and want to harken back to those days. I believe that it delivers!

    O-D


    Last edited by Osmund-Davizid on Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:40 am; edited 1 time in total
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    Mon Aug 17, 2020 8:40 pm  
    Pros - Savage Tide

    So we start with the positives for the Savage Tide.

    Pros: Again, this is a very Greyhawk Adventure Path. While the action takes place in corners of the world that are off the beaten path (and indeed, off the original maps) this is part of the theme of exploration and discovery that makes this a more unique adventure style than the typical dungeon trek.

    Next, the settings. Sasserine, Scuttlecove, and the Isle of Dread are the main locations for this Adenture Path (on Oerth - there is a lot of Abyssal plane hopping in the highest levels). Sasserine was described in a backdrop article in Issue 139. Scuttlecove and the Isle itself were not originally introduced in this Adventure Path - but this series of adventures truly fleshes each of them out. The Isle of Dread came from Basic D&D and had a short updated adventure in Dungeon (Issue 114) before coming into full glory in this series. Scuttlecove was first introduced in Dungeon # 95 and retrofit into Greyhawk.

    Each of these locations has tremendous atmosphere and character. The colony of Farshore is the exact type of frontier town that an adventurer can make their mark in. Sasserine is a good addition to the overall Greyhawk canon that an enterprising DM can incorporate with or without using this AP. Scuttlecove may vie with Dorakaa, Rauxes, and Erelhei-Cinlu as the most evil city on Oerth! That is the stuff of adventures!

    There is a recurring villain that bedevils your players from the earliest adventures to the very end. A rogue turned pirate turned death knight! If you can make his appearance be memorable without being forced, this is a good running battle throughout the series.

    Finally, the use of Demogorgon was a good choice. As I mentioned earlier, this is a throw back to the earliest days of D&D - with the Isle of Dread and the Prince of Demons, this adventure at once feels familiar and brand new.

    All in all, a very solid AP.
    GreySage

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    Tue Aug 18, 2020 3:14 pm  

    Yes! The Savage Tide is my favorite AP. Happy

    I absolutely loved the expanded information on the Amedio Jungle, the inclusion of Scuttlecove and the Isle of Dread, and the way the adventures on the outer planes played out. I appreciated that they didn't rewrite the Isle of Dread, but added new adventures to areas that had been unused in the original adventure and advanced the timeline so that the few areas they reused did not contradict the original module. I thought the inclusion of a new portion of the Lost Shrine of Tomoacan was a fantastic inspiration, as well.

    There were only a couple of things I did not particularly like. First, I find bullywugs to be an uninspiring opponent. They are just boring. Plus, for grognards like me, the D&D cartoon completely confused me regarding them, since in that media they were shown to be neutrally-aligned at worst, maybe even good! I would have been happier if they had found a different low-level opponent for the first part of the adventure.

    Second, Sasserine seemed a bit too large of a city to be positioned on the southern coast of Jeklea Bay. I like it being there, I just think it should be far smaller. Especially since Cauldron is fairly close to the southwest. That is two very large cities that are presented as typically Medieval European. If they had been described as having a more Central American culture, I would have been more willing to accept them at the size they are presented as being.

    As far as mechanics go, I was concerned about the Bar-Igura encounters on the Isle of Dread. These creatures have the ability to Teleport at will anywhere they want, even to other planes like the Abyss, while taking an unwilling victim along. This encounter is for mid-level PCs. Sure, a careful party may defeat them before any party member fails a saving throw, but that is a serious threat, especially since the Bar-Igura are supposed to attack by surprise. There is practically no way for the party to detect their presence before they attack. Again, for 8th - 12th level PCs, being teleported to the Abyss and left there alone is an automatic death sentence. I read through the AP twice, but never got to run it that far, so I am uncertain if my concern is valid or not.

    To end on a positive note (because this AP really is awesome!), I will say that the piratey adventures including Scuttlecove, the adventures on, and under, the Isle of Dread, and the plane-hopping adventures building to the battle for an entire layer of the Abyss against the Prince of Demons himself, is wonderfully inspiring.

    Oh, and Gwynharwif is my fantasy lover. Razz Laughing

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    Tue Aug 18, 2020 8:07 pm  
    Cons - Savage Tide

    Now for the downsides to the Savage Tide AP:

    Cons: The tone of the series is very swashbuckling, with a lot of sea travel and action involved. That is not everyone's cup of tea. If your game style is more invested in the civilized areas of Greyhawk, the gameplay is now in a very isolated part of the world. With some modification to the timeline, you may be able to get the party back to civilized lands for a break. Otherwise, they are committed to adventuring on the far side of the Oerth for a long time.

    Very high level stuff is involved in this AP. In order for the players to have a chance against Demogorgon in his own plane, the players will need high level help. They get it in kind of a weird shoehorned way in which a trap by Demogorgon results in a branch of the River Styx getting diverted, earning the ire of Charon. Who then directs the players to have a meeting with the Witch-Queen Iggwilv herself! She gives the players a list of Demogorgon's available enemies that the PCs can try to ally with. Then its off to other planes of existence to try to cobble together an army. Whew!

    To be fair, the modules actually make the process of building up this force of otherplanars by a bunch of mere mortals to be relatively plausible. Orcus needs no special urging to march on Demogorgon, and the other entities have their own agendas as well. The PC's mission to stop the Savage Tide is a side show to the main fight. Too much of this and it may appear that the PCs are no longer in charge of their own adventure.

    The best way to look at it is that the PCs are presenting these other entities the opportunity to do what they already want. The grand final battle may start with all these other entities, but it results in a face to face confrontation with Demogorgon in the end. The Savage Tide is personally important for Demogorgon to complete, so he has to come after them at some time. The PCs are at one point of the battle minor mortals among all these demons and then they are on the center stage at the very end. Handled properly, this can work.

    Still, some of the actions the PCs need to do to make some of the alliances work may be out of character for some of the more LG aligned folk (i.e. paladins are going to have a rough go of it dealing with the demons). I think that the overall tone makes this an AP more suited to the free-wheeling adventure types rather than the more orthodox. That may be a matter of taste but good to keep in mind.

    Final nitpick - one high level name drop that I did not like was the treatment of Saint Kargoth. He is stuck in the final battle as (more or less) just a guard in a room. I think the first of the death knights should have some more involvement, especially seeing his Greyhawk connections.

    Next, when I get the time, I will summarize.
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    Thu Sep 17, 2020 6:20 pm  
    Overall Assessment - Savage Tide

    Overall impressions of the Savage Tide AP,

    Just like the Age of Worms before it, this AP is a solid entry to any Greyhawk fan's module collection. It is a positive to set the action set in a remote part of Oerth, as it is unlikely that these adventures would interfere with anyone's campaign. There are enough Greyhawk and classic references throughout the series without it becoming awkward.

    Once things get to the Outer Planes, the difficulty ratchets up exponentially. There is a big challenge to refereeing all the high level demons and other planar personages, and the risk becomes whether the players can hold their own among all these greater powers.

    But the negatives are far outweighed by the many positive features. I give this a five star out of five treatment. If you can collect the magazines and give this a try, do so. It is well worth the effort.

    O-D
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    Wed Oct 07, 2020 5:52 pm  
    Assessment of all three APs

    Now to look at the APs compared to each other.

    Reading them all together and looking at them both on their own merits and as part of Greyhawk lore, here is where I think these Adventure Paths stack up against each other.

    The Shackled City is my least favorite. I originally reviewed it a long time ago and now looking at it, some of its flaws come out more then they did on my first read. Especially in the early adventures, the AP is more of a sandbox for the city of Cauldron than an advancing plot, but that is OK. Lots of dungeon crawls, but again that is fine. I give it three and a half stars out of five, but I add a half star for the hard back book of the AP. It not only consolidates the many modules into one book, but it gives more information and bonus adventures to boot. Would that the other APs get the same treatment!

    Age of Worms gets four stars out of five. Better Greyhawk connections, a better Big Bad Evil Guy in Kyuss, lots of doom-and-gloom villainy, what's not to like? Some parts of the adventure seem overly complex and difficult for players to survive as written. I also do not like it when the PCs have to slay a deity. But this was one great AP!

    Savage Tide though is my favorite and I think merits a full five star evaluation. I think it struck a good balance with some nods to classic D&D with the Isle of Dread setting and Demogorgon as the main foe, but it also made good use of new concepts such as the city of Scuttlecove and added them into Greyhawk lore. Again, some parts were extremely difficult as written, but then any adventure that prominently features demons as enemies is going to have epic level challenges. So it is my favorite and I think if you are a Greyhawk fan you should check it out.

    With over 30 modules' worth of adventures, that is a lot of material to read through, and some points were better than others. But taken as a whole, all three of these APs are great additions to collective Greyhawk lore. All are worth your time to read through, and hopefully have a chance to play.

    O-D
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    Wed Oct 07, 2020 6:05 pm  
    More Dungeon Grewhawk materials

    This ends the APs that were made during the print run of Dungeon Magazine. There was another AP that was done in the electronic run of Dungeon, the Scales of War. I understand that this AP was done in more of a generic setting. The BBEG in this setting was Tiamat, which is nice for the old school types.

    Having said that, there were additions in the pages of Dungeon Magazine that essentially add in more details to existing Greyhawk adventures or else consist of mini-campaigns all their own.

    Dungeon Issues 117, 118, and 119 had a short series on the City of Istivin after the Greyhawk Wars. Maure Castle was given more levels in Issues 112, 124 and 139, essentially making the module WG5 Modenkainen's Fantastic Adventure more of an epic quest than a prowl through mostly empty dungeon rooms.

    There were other tidbits of lore and Greyhawk adventures in Dungeon Magazine that are worth tracking down. There is a fine index of Dungeon materials right here on Canonfire so I suggest that (if you haven't already) you download that index and do some hunting for Greyhawk materials in the old magazine sources. It is often worth your time.

    O-D
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    Wed Oct 07, 2020 7:53 pm  

    Nicely summarized, O-D!

    I haven’t looked at Istivin or Savage Tide in years, and seem to recall another adventure or two tied to Demogorgon via the revised X1, perhaps?

    I still think that a collected AoW or ST hardcover would make a wonderful licensed product!—perhaps that’s a good one to suggest for one of Goodman’s reprints too (I’ve already suggested WG5/Maure Castle).

    Allan.
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    Fri Oct 09, 2020 8:56 am  
    Add-on adventures to Savage Tide

    You reminded me of a couple of additional adventures that could be added to the Savage Tide series.

    One of the things that I did not like in Savage Tide was the treatment of St Kargoth, the first of the Death Knights. In the adventure, he is just one of the last guards the PCs have to fight. No story or plot points related to him.

    There was a Dungeon Adventure in Issue 120, "The Lost Temple of Demogorgon" by Sean Reynolds, that not only has the temple to the big D but introduces a Death Knight with Greyhawk connections. Lord Khayven of Rax, one of the original Death Knights, is the main villain (he was introduced in the Dragon Magazine articles on Death Knights from Issues 290 and 291).

    The setting of the adventure is supposed to take place near Irongate, but that can be modified. Lord Khayven is seeking to return to life and wants to try to reverse his condition by performing some ceremony in a temple of Demogorgon. I think that you can add this adventure in as a side quest in the Savage Tide series, working it in as a way to weaken Demogorgon. If successful, the PCs come to the attention of St Kargoth and can thus work him into the overall plot.

    Alternatively, you can use this adventure as a different springboard to enter the Savage Tide series from another direction. If your PCs are of higher levels and you do not want to run the low level modules in Savage Tide, this adventure may work to get your people involved in opposing Demogorgon with clues taking them to the Isle of Dread from the Irongate area as opposed to the Sasserine area. Just a thought.

    Another Dungeon adventure that can be used as a side quest in Savage Tide is from Issue 114, it takes place on the Isle of Dread and was based on an adventure hook from the original X1 module.

    With creative work a lot of additional adventures can be added into any of the APs. Same can be said of any adventure really. So if you plan on tackling the Savage Tide, here are a couple more add-ons that may assist.

    O-D


    Last edited by Osmund-Davizid on Fri Oct 09, 2020 8:57 am; edited 1 time in total
    Journeyman Greytalker

    Joined: Aug 10, 2003
    Posts: 254
    From: Harker Heights, TX

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    Fri Oct 09, 2020 8:57 am  
    Add-on adventures to Savage Tide

    The adventure from Dungeon Issue 114 was called "Torrents of Dread"

    FYI

    O-D
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