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    Ratik’s Military 576-586 Common Year Part II
    Posted on Fri, October 29, 2021 by LordCeb
    jamesdglick writes "

    Service in Ratik’s Military 

    Issue of Clothing, Equipment, & Mounts:

      All: Wool Outfit (undyed; included shoes), Boots; Tabard (Ratik azure, vert, and gules); Cloak (undyed); Backpack; Waterskin.[20]   

      Private (Infantry Spearman)[21]: Full Studded Leather Armor; Iron Helm; Longspear. 

      Private (Infantry Light Crossbowman): Upper Body/Arm Studded Leather Armor; Iron Helm; Light Crossbow; Bolt Case; 10 Bolts. 

      Private (Infantry Shortbowman): Upper Body/Arm Studded Leather Armor; Iron Helm; Shortbow; Quiver; 20 Arrows.  

      Private (Infantry Drummer): Upper Body/Arm Studded Leather Armor; Iron Helm; Drum. 

      Private (Volunteer Borderer Slinger): Upper Body/Arm Studded Leather Armor; Iron Helm; Sling; Pouch; 10 Bullets. 

      Private (Volunteer Borderer Light Crossbowman): Upper Body/Arm Leather Armor or Upper Body/Arm Padded Armor; Iron Helm; Light Crossbow; Bolt Case; 10 Bolts. 

      Private (Volunteer Borderer Shortbowman)[22]: Upper Body/Arm Leather Armor or Upper Body/Arm Padded Armor; Iron Helm; Shortbow; Quiver; 20 Arrows. 

      Private (Volunteer Borderer Bugler): Upper Body/Arm Leather Armor or Upper Body/Arm Padded Armor; Iron Helm; Bugle. 

      Trooper: Full Studded Leather Armor, Iron Helm, Lance; Light Crossbow; Bolt Case; 10 Bolts; Light Warhorse;[23] Military Saddle; Bit & Bridle; Saddle Blanket; Horse Shoes x 4; Curry Comb; Feed Bag. 

      Trooper (Bugler): Full Studded Leather Armor; Iron Helm; Lance; Bugle; Light Warhorse; Military Saddle; Bit & Bridle; Saddle Blanket; Horse Shoes x 4; Curry Comb; Feed Bag. 

      Marine: Full Studded Leather Armor; Iron Helm; Handaxe.  

      Marine (Bugler): Full Studded Leather Armor; Iron Helm; Bugle. 

      Sapper: Full Studded Leather Armor; Iron Helm; Handaxe; either Pick, Shovel, or Two-Handed Axe. 

      Sentry (Garrison): Upper Body Studded Leather Armor; Iron Helm; Shortspear.

       The Penal Companies (578 CY) were equipped as infantry, except with shortspears (no missile weapons issued, but sometimes carried). Those sentenced to serve in them were paid as garrison sentries, while the volunteer cadre were paid as infantry. The halflings of the Skirmisher Companies (581 CY) were equipped as volunteer borderers (slings and shortbows), but paid as infantry. (See Appendix 4 for additional details) 

         All privates and NCO’s were issued a new set of plain wool clothing every six months; a new tabard (in “Ratik” colors i.e. blue, red and green), a cloak, and a pair of boots every year, and a waterskin and backpack every six years. Cavalrymen got a new saddle blanket and four horseshoes every year, and a military saddle and bit & bridle every six years. All other equipment was repaired or replaced as needed (at the soldier’s expense if it was the soldier’s fault).[24] Soldier’s generally kept their issued clothes, Tabard, Cloak, and Boots. At the company commander’s discretion, honorably discharged soldiers were allowed to keep other used equipment at a discount. 

         Soldiers were generally allowed to use additional or better gear (e.g., some soldiers carried bucklers or shields, and most had some sort of side arms, like a dagger), as long as it did not interfere with their duties (e.g. a spearman who tried to wear full plate would have had trouble keeping up with the formation, particularly if they started double-timing).[25] In some cases, the unit provided additional gear. Provincial regulars, and feudal and freehold levies, were expected to maintain similar standards of gear, and wore their own livery, or at least a field sign (e.g., a sprig of pine during the Battle of the Loftwood).[26]   

         Higher ranking individuals, particularly those working on staffs, were generally issued additional equipment: 

       Craftsman (LCPL equivalent): Tools (as appropriate). 

       Master Craftsman (SGT equivalent): Masterwork-Quality Tools (as appropriate)—the original, lesser quality, tools were returned for re-issue to someone else. 

      Apprentice Arcane Spellcaster (PVT equivalent): Spell Component Pouch. Some components might be issued on a case-by-case basis. 

      Arcane Spellcaster (LCPL equivalent) or Senior Arcane Spellcaster (CPL equivalent): Wand of (various 0 level spells). The spellcaster kept and maintained the Spell Component Pouch. Some components might be issued on a case-by-case basis. 

      Master Arcane Spellcaster (SGT equivalent): Wand of (various 1st level spells)—the 0 level wand was returned for re-issue to someone else. The spellcaster kept and maintained the Spell Component Pouch. Some components might be issued on a case-by-case basis. 

      Apprentice Divine Spellcaster (PVT equivalent): Healer’s Kit and Spell Component Pouch. Some components might be issued on a case-by-case basis. 

      Divine Spellcaster (LCPL equivalent) or Senior Divine Spellcaster (CPL equivalent): Wand of Cure Minor Wounds- the 0 level wand is returned for re-issue to someone else. The Healer’s Kit and the Spell Component Pouch were both kept and maintained. Some components might be issued on a case-by-case basis. 

      Master Divine Spellcaster (SGT equivalent): Wand of Cure Light Wounds—the 0 level wand is returned for re-issue to someone else. The Healer’s Kit and Spell Component Pouch were both kept and maintained. Some components might be issued on a case-by-case basis. 

      Bodyguards, Sergeants Major, Subalterns, and Officers serving on the various staffs were issued a Light Warhorse with Military Saddle; Bit & Bridle; Saddle Blanket; Horse Shoes x 4; Curry Comb; Feed Bag. 

        The three Brigade Commanders, the General/Field Marshal, and Archbaron Lexnol had Aspect Mirrors for long range communications. Each headquarters also had carts, wagons, draft animals, tents, desks, chests, engineering tools, and the like. 

       When a General was promoted to Field Marshal, he was issued the Baton. 

       At the chain of commands’ discretion, anyone might be issued additional equipment or mounts depending on the mission and the soldiers’ individual skill. Scouts particularly fell into this situation, particularly masterwork, silver, cold iron, and/or magical arrows, bolts, and sling bullets, potions of invisibility, horse shoes of speed, etc. The usual limiting factor was obviously expense, but Ratik was unusually well financed in the late 570s and early 580s.[27] 

    Daily Rations:

         Enlisted men got 16 oz. of wheat flour (or barley flour for those not considered fully trained and disciplined, including anyone undergoing initial entry training);[28] 8 oz. of oatmeal; 4 oz. of meat and/or cheese; 4 oz. of vegetables (typically potatoes, turnips, onions and/or leeks);[29] 1 oz. salt; 1 oz. lard or butter; and 1 pint of beer (in garrison; clean water was always provided in garrison and in the field, with “Purify Food & Drink” spells, if necessary). This allowance was generally adequate. [30] Some soldiers gave bakeries their flour ration, some salt, and some lard, and a copper piece in return for 16 ounces of bread. Some hired cooks (often the wives of NCOs) to handle everything. As gentlemen, officers and subalterns bought their own rations, or optionally, payed 2 sp per day for soldier’s rations in the field.

    Daily Feed for Mounts:

       Each horse got 8 lbs. of oats and 8 lbs. of hay per day. This allowance was generally adequate for light warhorses.[31] Feed and care was the responsibility of each soldier, although some officers hired troopers to handle the day-to-day care or their own mounts. Divine Spellcasters handled some of the veterinary concerns and blacksmiths were also farriers.[32]

    Garrison Quarters Standards:

         Each soldier got a cot, two sheets, two blankets, and a chest with lock and key. Each squad got one chamber bucket per squad. Platoon bays were typical, with at least two fireplaces. The sergeants and subalterns of a platoon generally shared a separate room, and officers got rooms of their own.

    Monthly Pay:[33]  

      Apprentice Craftsman: 1 g.p. 

      Apprentice Arcanist: 1 g.p. 

      Apprentice Divine: 1 g.p. 

      Private, Volunteer Borderer: 1½ g.p. [34] 

      Private, Infantry: 1 g.p. 

      Private, Marine: 1½ g.p. 

      Private, Sapper: 1 g.p. 

      Private (Sailor): 1 g.p (There was no regular navy before 586; This was for those levied for 56 days’ service). 

      Sentry (Garrison): ½ g.p. 

      Teamster / Servant: ½ g.p. 

      Trooper: 1½ g.p. 

      All soldiers also got a share of booty in battle. 

      Pay days were typically the last Freeday before a fest week. Soldiers got an additional month’s pay every fourth fest week after their enlistment. Pay for all recruits undergoing initial entry training was ½ g.p. for that month. Those sentenced to serve in the Penal/Probation Companies were paid as garrison sentries, but the volunteer cadre were paid as infantry. Members of the Halfling Skirmisher Companies were also paid as infantry. 

      Since the army handled the soldier’s basic cares, the above listed pay was relatively generous. Other than spellcasters and craftsmen, the Volunteer Borderers, marines, and the cavalry usually attracted the better recruits; garrison detachments got the leftovers. Pay at the entry level might seem low for spellcasters and craftsmen, but this improved significantly after promotion. 

      Leave and Furlough: 

      Leave was not a guaranteed benefit, but company commanders and higher officers could grant a few days’ leave to their subordinates, as long as it did not harm their unit’s readiness. This was typically granted during fest weeks. Commanders could also grant longer furloughs (without pay) at their discretion. [35]

    Promotion (Insignia/Requirements/Benefits as of 578 CY) [36]:

     Junior NCOs: 1 horizontal colored* stripe above tabard’s right hem [37]/ 18 months’ time in service minimum/ 2 shares of booty in battle. Junior NCO ranks included:

         -Lance Corporal: Private’s (or Trooper’s, etc.) pay x 2 per month.

         -Cohort Commander’s Bugler: Recommendation of cohort commander was also required / 3 g.p. pay per month.

         -Craftsman: Journeyman’s Certification required; Recommendation of cohort commander / 6 g.p.per month.

         -Scout: Also wore a Ratik (red, blue, and green) sash; Must be a subject of Ratik; Recommendation of cohort commander / 3 g.p. per month.

          -Spellcaster (Arcane) [Wizard]: Ratik sash; Ratik subject; 1st level Wizard spellcasting ability was required; Recommendation of cohort commander / 3 g.p. per month.

        -Spellcaster (Divine) [Priest]: Ratik sash; Ratik subject; 1st level Cleric spellcasting ability was required; Recommendation of cohort commander / 3 g.p. per month.

      Mid-Level NCOs: 2 horizontal colored* stripes on hem of tabard / 4 years’ time in service and 1 years’ time in grade as a Junior NCO minimum / 3 shares of booty in battle. Mid-Level NCO ranks included:

         -Corporal: Private’s pay x 3 per month.

         -Brigade Commander’s Bugler: Recommendation of brigade commander / 6 g.p. per month.

         -Senior Craftsman: Journeyman’s Certification; Recommendation of cohort commander / 12 g.p. per month.

         -Senior Scout: Ratik sash / Ratik subject; Recommendation of cohort commander / 6 g.p. per month.

         -Senior Spellcaster (Arcane) [Wizard]: Ratik sash / Ratik subject; 1st level Wizard spellcasting ability; Recommendation of cohort commander / 6 g.p. per month.

         -Senior Spellcaster (Divine) [Priest]: Ratik sash / Ratik subject; 1st level Cleric spellcasting; Recommendation of cohort commander / 6 g.p. per month.

         Senior NCOs: 3 horizontal colored* stripes above tabard’s right hem / 8 years’ time in service and 1 years’ time in grade as an NCO minimum / 4 shares of booty in battle. Senior NCO ranks included:

         -Sergeant: Literate; Private’s pay x 4 per month.

         -Archbaron’s Bodyguard: Recommendation of the archbaron / 12 g.p. per month.

         -Archbaron’s Bugler: Recommendation of the archbaron / 12 g.p. per month.

         -Master Craftsman: Master’s Certification; Recommendation of cohort commander / 24 g.p. per month.[38]

         -Ranger: Ratik sash / Ratik subject; Recommendation of the archbaron / 12 g.p. per month.

         -Master Spellcaster (Arcane) [Wizard]: Ratik sash / Ratik subject; 2nd level Wizard spellcasting ability; Recommendation of the archbaron / 12 g.p. per month.

         -Master Spellcaster (Divine) [Priest]: Ratik sash / Ratik subject; 2nd level Cleric spellcasting ability; Recommendation of the archbaron / 12 g.p. per month.

     Tribune [Subaltern; considered to be between an NCO and an officer]: 1 silver sunburst above tabard’s right hem; Ratik sash / Literate; Ratik subject; Recommendation of the archbaron / 6 g.p. per month and 6 shares of booty in battle.

     Sergeant Major (the most senior NCO rank): Literate; 3 horizontal colored* stripes above tabard’s right hem; Also wore a Ratik sash / 10 years’ time in service and 1 years’ time in grade as a Sergeant minimum / 18 g.p. per month and 5 shares of booty in battle.

     Lieutenant: 1 silver sunburst on tabard collar; Silver & Ratik sash / 2 years’ time in service and 1 years’ time in grade as a Subaltern minimum; Recommendation of the archbaron / 24 g.p. per month; 12 shares of booty in battle.

     First Lieutenant: 2 silver sunbursts on tabard collar; Silver & Ratik sash / 4 years’ time in service and 1 years’ time in grade as a Lieutenant minimum; Recommendation of the archbaron / 30 g.p. per month; 18 shares of booty in battle.

     Captain: 3 silver sunbursts on tabard collar; Silver & Ratik sash / 8 years’ time in service and 1 years’ time in grade as a First Lieutenant minimum; Recommendation of the archbaron / 60 g.p. per month; 24 shares of booty in battle.

     Commander: 1 gold sunburst on tabard collar; Gold & Ratik sash / 12 years’ time in service and 1 years’ time in grade as a Captain minimum; Recommendation of the archbaron / 90 g.p. per month; 36 shares of booty in battle.

      Senior Commander: 2 gold sunbursts on tabard collar; Gold & Ratik sash / 20 years’ time in service and 1 years’ time in grade as a Commander minimum / Recommendation of the archbaron; 120 g.p. per month; 48 shares of booty in battle.

      General: 3 gold sunbursts on tabard collar; Gold & Ratik sash; 25 years’ time in service and 1 years’ time in grade as a Commander minimum; Recommendation of the archbaron / 150 g.p. per month; 60 shares of booty in battle.

      Marshal: Baton; 3 gold sunbursts on tabard collar; Gold & Ratik sash / 25 years’ time in service and 1 years’ time in grade as a General minimum; Recommendation of the archbaron / 180 g.p. per month; 60 shares of booty in battle.

      Archbaron: Ratik sash / Hereditary / One-eighth of all shares in battle.[39]

    *Branch Colors: Infantry: Grey; Cavalry: Yellow; Borderers: Dark Green; Marines: Light Blue; Sappers: Red; Craftsmen & Spellcasters: Dark Blue. Members of HQs Teams or in Garrison units wear their old branch color.[40]

     Total authorized wages for Ratik’s Regular Army per month: 12,618 g.p. 5 s.p. (not including garrisons and supernumeries).  

    Security Clearances:

      There were three levels of security clearance: Ratik (i.e., red, blue, and green); Silver; Gold (in ascending order). Security clearances were generally based on the holder’s sash color, but those who directly served a cohort or brigade commander were often granted silver clearances (particularly scouts and subalterns), while the archbaron’s staff normally got gold clearances. Members of the archbaron’s family often had higher clearances than their ranks would normally indicate (e.g., even as a subaltern, Alain held a higher clearance than Ratik).

     

    Bibliography

    Author Unknown (presumably the Nyrond triad for the Living Greyhawk Campaign). Nyrond Gazeteer 593. [military descriptions as of 592 CY] 

    Author Unknown (presumably the Ratik triad for the Living Greyhawk Campaign). Ratik Gazeteer 593

    Abbott, Peter and Nigel Thomas. Germany’s Eastern Front Allies. London: Osprey Publishing, 1982: Reprint 1985. 

    Baker, Rich and Skip Williams.  Combat and Tactics [AD&D2]. No Place of Publishing given; presumably Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1995. 

    Bambra, Jim. The Complete Book of Dwarves. Lake Geneva: TSR, 1993. 

    Breault, Mike and Thomas M. Reid. Glory of Rome. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1993. 

    Bartlett, Clive. English Longbowman. London: Osprey, 1995. 

    Bukhari, Emir. Napoleon’s Dragoons and Lancers. Botley, Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 1976. 

    Bukhari, Emir. Napoleon’s Hussars. London: Osprey Publishing, 1978. 

    Collins, Noonan, and Stark. Complete Warrior. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003. 

    Collins, McDermott, and Schubert. Heroes of Battle. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003. 

    Cook, David. (Greyhawk) Wars. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1991. 

    Cook, Monte, and Jonathan Tweet, Skip Williams. Dungeon Master’s Guide (v. 3.5). Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003. 

    Cook, Monte, and Jonathan Tweet, Skip Williams. Player’s Handbook (v. 3.5). Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003. 

    Cruel Summer Lord, “Living Greyhawk Gazetteer Addendum: The Aerdy East, Part 3”, Canonfire. (posted 10 JUL 2004), see “Ratik”. Accessed 27 SEP 2019: http://www.canonfire.com/cf/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=456 

    D’Amato, Rafaele. Roman Centurions 31 BC- AD 500. Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 2012. 

    Durham, Keith.  The Border Reivers. Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 1995. 

    Fosten, Bryan. Wellington’s Light Cavalry. Botley, Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 1982. 

    Fosten, Bryan. Wellington’s Heavy Cavalry. Botley, Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 1982. 

    Fowler, Jeffery. Axis Cavalry in World War II. Botley, Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 2001. 

    Gygax, Gary. Dungeon Master’s Guide [AD&D1]. No place of publishing given; presumably Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1979. 

    Gygax, Gary. “Developments from Stonefist to South Province”, Dragon #57 (January 1982): pp. 13-16. 

    Gygax, Gary. A Guide to the World of Greyhawk Fantasy Setting. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1983. 

    Gygax, Gary. Glossography for the Guide to the World of Greyhawk Fantasy Setting. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1983. 

    Gygax, Gary. Monster Manual [AD&D1]. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1977; Reprint 1979. 

    Gygax, Gary. Saga of Old City. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1985. 

    Gygax, Gary. “Warhorses and Barding”, Dragon Magazine #74 (June 1983): pp. 4, 6. 

    Henson, Dale. Howl from the North. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1991. 

    Holian, Gary, Erik Mona, Sean K. Reynolds, and Frederick Weining, Living Greyhawk Gazetteer. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2000. 

    Lau, Matt, Empty Coffers RTK[m]3-03 Living Greyhawk Ratik Regional Adventure. 

    Lau, Matt. Enemy Lines RTK[m]2-05 Living Greyhawk Ratik Regional Adventure. 

    Lau, Matt. Reflections RTK 0-01 Living Greyhawk Ratik Regional Adventure. 

    Lau, Matt, Scalphunt RTK[m]3-01 Living Greyhawk Ratik Regional Adventure.

    Lau, Matt. The Ungoblin RTK 3-05 Living Greyhawk Ratik Regional Adventure. 

    Lau, Matt. The Whispering Tide RTK 3-06 Living Greyhawk Ratik Regional Adventure. 

    Lavery, Brian. Nelson’s Navy. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press; Reprint London: Conway Maritime Press, 1989. 

    Kuntz, Rob. “The Great Kingdom and the Knights of Doom”, Dragon #59 (March 1982): pp. 24-25. 

    McNab, Chris. The Roman Army. NY: Metro Books, 2013; Reprint Osprey Publishing, 2010. 

    Michael, Nicholas. Armies of Medieval Burgundy. London: Osprey Publishing, 1983; Reprint 1989. Art by Gerry Embleton. 

    Mohan, Kim. Advance Dungeon & Dragons Wilderness Survival Guide. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1986. 

    Nicolle, David. Arthur and the Anglo-Saxon Wars. London: Osprey Publishing, 1984. Art by Angus McBride. 

    Phillips, T.R., ed. The Roots of Strategy, Epitome of Military Science by Flavius Vegetius Renatus. Harrisburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 1985. 

    Salas, Dan. “Rel Mord”, Fate of Istus. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1989. 

    Sargent, Carl. Atlas of the Flanaess: From the Ashes. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1992. 

    Sargent, Carl. The Marklands. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1993. 

    Sargent, Carl, and Rik Rose. Greyhawk: Folk, Feuds, and Factions. Lake Geneva, TSR, 1989. 

    Simkins, Michael. The Roman Army for Caesar to Trajan. London: Osprey Publishing, 1984; Reprint 1998. 

    Wilson, Johnny. “Prying Eyes”, Dragon #303 (January 2003): pp. 72-78. 

     

    Endnotes

    [20] Monte Cook, Jonathan Tweet, and Skip Williams, Player’s Handbook [v. 3.5] (Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003), 116-132. 

    [21] Lau, Enemy Lines RTK[m]2-05, p. 3; 

         Gygax, A Guide to the World of Greyhawk Fantasy Setting, p. 32. 

       For 592, Lau describes five male and female soldiers as War1s with scale armor, large wooden shields, and shortspears. In Gygax 1983, Ratikkan infantrymen appear to be long spearmen or even pikemen (“The baronial levies [see endnote 5 for my argument that this should apply to the regulars] consist of schiltrons of spearmen and a small force of light cavalry…”), so it’s hard to know what these guys and gals represent. It’s possible that they might be provincial levies instead of regulars, or might even be from a temporarily hired mercenary band (e.g., Queg’s band at the Battle of the Loftwood), or maybe tactical assumptions and equipment standards changed between 578 and 592. They may have been substandard garrison troops, but the circumstance seems unlikely. I think the most likely answer would be over-armored penal/probationary troops.   

    [22] Lau, Scalphunt RTK[m]3-01, p. 5. 

        For 593, Lau describes a group of 4 (plus wounded) male and female “Loftwood Foresters”, but these are not Ratikkan troops, let alone borderers. 

    [23] Emir Bukhari, Napoleon’s Hussars (London: Osprey Publishing, 1978), 16; 

         Fosten, Wellington’s Light Cavalry, 25; 

         Fosten, Wellington’s Heavy Cavalry, 21; 

         Jeffrey Fowler, Axis Cavalry in World War II (Botley, Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 2001), 42, 43, 44, 45, 46; plates A1, B1, D2, E1, G1; 

        Gary Gygax, “Warhorses and Barding”, Dragon Magazine #74 (June 1983), pp. 4, 6, 4. 

        Gygax defined light warhorses as 14-15 hands high, medium warhorses as 15½ - 16 ½ hands high, and heavies as 18 hands high or taller. I seem to remember that the medieval destrier really was not a Clydesdale, but whatever. For comparison, British Napoleonic-era horses were normally 14 ½- 16 hands high, French hussar mounts were a minimum of 14 ½ hands high in 1793, but only 13½ hands high in 1805. German cavalry mounts were 15.3-16.2 hands high, pack horses were usually 14 hands high, and Cossack horses were about 14.2 hands high. Romanian cavalry mounts were 16 hands high. There were some breeding improvements over time. 

    [24] Fowler, Axis Cavalry in World War II, 23; 

         Gary Gygax, Dungeon Master’s Guide [AD&D1] (No place of publishing given; presumably Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1979), p. 29, 30. 

         The AD&D 1 standard was 1 armorer for every 40 soldiers, and one blacksmith for the first 40 men or mounts, then one additional blacksmith for every 160. This would make Ratik’s forces somewhatheavily dependent on outside purchases. As mentioned elsewhere, Ratik could afford it. Historically, horseshoes normally needed maintenance or repair every 4-6 weeks, or every 600 kilometers, at least during WWII. 

    [25] Lau, Enemy Lines RTK[m]2-05, p. 3; 

       The five male and female soldiers wore scale armor and carried large wooden shields. I am not sure what they were meant to represent; scale and shield would slow them down. Maybe the static nature of their mission allowed for it, or they were non-Ratikkan mercenaries. 

    [26] Matt Lau, The Ungoblin RTK 3-05 Living Greyhawk Ratik Regional Adventure. 

    [27] Gygax, “Developments from Stonefist to South Province”, 15. 

          “The loot gained from the invaders was considerable…” 

    [28] Phillips, ed., Epitome of Military Science by Flavius Vegetius Renatus, 84-85. 

        Continuing the Great Kingdom-Roman analogy, Romans soldiers had to eat barley until they were considered qualified with their weapons. They must not have been fond of barley if that was an incentive to get their act together. Of course, simply being allowed to eat wheat would be something of a status thing. I’ve adopted with it for Ratik. 

    [29] Johnny Wilson, “Prying Eyes”, Dragon #303 (JAN 2003): pp. 72-78, 14, 15. 

        The story is apparently set in Ratik. Calmet had potatoes and turnips in his root cellar, and the half-orc had leeks on his breath. Onion seems reasonable for a northern climate. 

    [30] Kim Mohan, Advance Dungeon & Dragons Wilderness Survival Guide (Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1986), pp. 52-53; 

        Monte Cook, Jonathan Tweet, and Skip Williams, Dungeon Master’s Guide [v. 3.5] (Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2003), 304. 

        This ration allowance would be in line with AD&D1 and D&D 3.5 ration rules.   

    [31] Cook, Tweet, and Williams, Player’s Handbook [v. 3.5], 129; 

        Bryan Fosten, Wellington’s Heavy Cavalry, 16; 

        Fowler, Axis Cavalry in World War II, 33; 

        Mohan, Advance Dungeon & Dragons Wilderness Survival Guide, 91.    

         The standard in AD&D 1.5 was 8 lbs. of feed per horse, for D&D 3.5, 10 lbs. of feed. Historically, the allowance for Napoleonic-era British heavy cavalry mounts was 8-10 lbs. of oats, 12-18 lbs. of hay, and 6-8 lbs. of straw. During WWII, the Wehrmacht allowance was an 5,000 gram (11.02 lbs.) feed bar, mostly consisting of oats, with yeast, potatoes, hay, and straw mixed in. The Ratikkan standard would be adequate. 

    [32] Emir Bukhari, Napoleon’s Dragoons and Lancers (Botby, Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 1976), 20. 

        Bukhari, Napoleon’s Hussars, 18. 

         Fowler, Axis Cavalry in World War II, 23 (farriers and veterinarians). 

         According to Bukhari, one Napoleonic-era veterinarian could normally take care of 500 horses. For some reason, Fowler puts the German ratio during WWII at one for every 300-400 horses (higher standards?). Fowler puts the farrier to horse ratio at one for every 250. Horseshoes normally needed maintenance or repair every 4-6 weeks, or every 600 kilometers. 

    [33] Gygax, Dungeon Master’s Guide [AD&D1], pp. 28-34; 

        Cook, Tweet, and Williams, Dungeon Master’s Guide [v. 3.5], pp. 105-106. 

        In AD&D1, the costs for soldiers assume all “associated expenditures which go with the position—salary or wage, uniform or clothing, housing, food, and sundry equipment… Exception: the cost does not include arms and armor. For cavalry, this would include the expenses associated with feeding and other care for the mounts (i.e., most or all of the additional cost of cavalry is associated with horse upkeep, not pay). In D&D 3.5, the same assumption seems to be made. The Ratikkan daily ration alone is worth 9-19 cp per day. 

    [34] Sargent, Atlas of the Flanaess, p. 34. 

        In the Spring 584 CY, “Specialized woodsmen troops with bows as well as sling-firing [sic] hillrunners are among the cream of Ratik’s forces.” Mr. Sargent must have paid attention to the writings of EGG with regards to the VBs, giving them elite status (not particularly surprising). 

    [35] Michael, Armies of Medieval Burgundy, 14. 

    [36] Author Unknown, Nyrond Gazeteer 593, “Military Organization and Composition”; 

        Author Unknown, “General Information on Ratik”, Ratik Gazeteer 593, “Notable Persons”; 

        Gygax, “Developments from Stonefist to South Province”, 15; 

        Kuntz, “The Great Kingdom and the Knights of Doom”, 24-25; 

         Dan Salas, “Rel Mord”, Fate of Istus (Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1989), 14. 

         In 579, Aerdi had the ranks of Captain (commanding 100-200), Greater Captains or Colonels (commanding 200-500 men), Generals (commanding 1,000-4,000 man “armies”), and two Marshals. Additionally, Gygax confirms that “the Marshal of the Archbarony laid a trap…” at the Battle of the Loftwood (implying the existence of an officer with the rank or title of Marshal). The Ratik Gazeteer mentions General Gatoril as the new commander of Ratik’s army in 593, so I figure that there might be a time lag between holding the position of overall commander and actual promotion to Marshal. This is somewhat different from the Nyrondese ranks, so there’s obviously been some drift. I decided to keep the rank titles of Captain, General, and Marshal, and substitute Commander and Senior Commander for Great Captain and Colonel.

    [37] David Nicolle, Arthur and the Anglo-Saxon Wars (London: Osprey Publishing, 1984), . Art by Angus McBride, plate A4, p. 34. 

         “…some students suggest that the particular details, e.g. the squares on the skirt, may have been associated with rank.” I figured this would tie in to the Roman Empire = Great Kingdom concept, but I substituted lines (like the like the Finns use) in lieu of squares for NCOs, and sunbursts for subalterns and officers, which look like the rosettes worn by Finnish officers, but the Aerdi sunburst being more appropriate for a nation with links to the old Great Kingdom. See: Peter Abbott and Nigel Thomas, Germany’s Eastern Front Allies (London: Osprey Publishing, 1982: Reprint 1985), Chart on p. 32.  

    [38] Clive Bartlett, English Longbowman (London: Osprey, 1995), 26.   

         The Master Craftsman’s compensation is somewhat in line with AD&D1 and D&D 3.5 rules here; historically, England paid bowyers the same as an archer. 

    [39] Gygax, “Developments from Stonefist to South Province”, 15. 

        Archbaron Lexnol presumably reinvested most of his plunder from the Battle of the Loftwood (“The loot gained from the invaders was considerable…”) into his armed forces.

    [40] Peter Abbott and Nigel Thomas, Germany’s Eastern Front Allies (London: Osprey Publishing, 1982: Reprint 1985), Chart on p. 32.  

        I used the Finnish Army as the inspiration for the colors of rank insignia and guidons. 

    "
     
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    Re: Ratik’s Military 576-586 Common Year Part II (Score: 1)
    by JellyMin on Mon, December 27, 2021
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    Wow, this is really interesting reading. I am glad I found this and got to read it. Great job on this content. I like it.







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